Temporary service disruption due to Covid19.

In accordance with the Restriction Movement Order issued by the Malaysian Government on 16th March 2020, all foreign tourists and visitors are not allowed to enter Malaysia starting from March 18, 2020 until further notice.

Therefore, all visa facilities (VTR and VDR) of eNTRI, eVISA, VOA and Visa Malaysia (Stickers) to all foreign nationals are temporarily suspended with the decisions made effective March 18, 2020 until further notice. Any application for visa after the restriction date will only be processed pending on the government decision based on the current situation.

Kindly consider rescheduling your travel plan if your travel date is in between the restriction date.

We apologies for any inconvenience caused.

Thank you.

Batu Caves

KUALA LUMPUR

LANDMARKS & ARCHITECTURE
HISTORICAL SITE
SCENERY & NATURE

Batu Caves is a limestone hill that has a series of caves and cave templesin Gombak, Selangor, Malaysia. It takes its name from the Sungai Batu (Stone River), which flowspast the hill. It is the tenth limestone hill from Ampang. Batu Caves is alsothe name of a nearby village.

The cave is one of the most popular Tamil shrines outside India, and is dedicated to Lord Murugan. It is the focal point of Hindu festival of Thaipusam in Malaysia. The Batu Caves serve as the focus of the Hindu community's yearly Thaipusam festival. They have become a pilgrimage site not only for Malaysian Hindus, but Hindus worldwide, from countries such as India, Australia and Singapore.

Batu Caves in short also referred as 10th Caves or Hill for Lord Muruga as there are six important holy shrines in India and four more in Malaysia. The three others in Malaysia are Kallumalai Temple in Ipoh, Tanneermalai Temple in Penang and Sannasimalai Temple in Malacca.

There are various undeveloped caves which contain a diverse range of cave fauna, including some unique species, such as Liphistiidae spiders and Eonycteris and fruit bats. The site is also well known for its numerous long-tailed macaques, which visitors feed — sometimes involuntarily.

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